//I doubt this is helpful, but FWIW…

I doubt this is helpful, but FWIW…

…as an investor who began my career right before the dot-com bubble burst and invested through the Great Recession, take some comfort in the fact that this experience is providing you younger investors with the perspective necessary to be successful over the long term. If you observe early in life that that there are relatively equal forces at all times trying to make money both on the long and the short side of any asset class, it will give you more opportunity to find long-term success. It’s my opinion that without losing your ass once or twice, you can’t possibly become a great long-term investor.Take heart in the potential that is being created in you. If you keep the memory of this and use it to grow, you’ll have an advantage going forward, be better attuned to risk and speculative market behavior, and you’ll give yourself more opportunity to generate higher long-term returns.I wanted to give it all up in late 2000…but for whatever reason I stuck with it, and it was worth it. If investing has called to you as a career or hobby, that is a great thing.Just my 2c. Good luck out there.P.s. I apologize if this sounds pretentious or anything like that. Definitely not my intention.

…as an investor who began my career right before the dot-com bubble burst and invested through the Great Recession, take some comfort in the fact that this experience is providing you younger investors with the perspective necessary to be successful over the long term. If you observe early in life that that there are relatively equal forces at all times trying to make money both on the long and the short side of any asset class, it will give you more opportunity to find long-term success. It's my opinion that without losing your ass once or twice, you can't possibly become a great long-term investor.

Take heart in the potential that is being created in you. If you keep the memory of this and use it to grow, you'll have an advantage going forward, be better attuned to risk and speculative market behavior, and you'll give yourself more opportunity to generate higher long-term returns.

I wanted to give it all up in late 2000…but for whatever reason I stuck with it, and it was worth it. If investing has called to you as a career or hobby, that is a great thing.

Just my 2c. Good luck out there.

P.s. I apologize if this sounds pretentious or anything like that. Definitely not my intention.